Monday, January 20, 2020

PANIS ANGELICUS: A CHURCH SONG DEDICATED TO A MADE UP STORY


You may have heard Panis Angelicus performed by Andrea Bocelli or Luciano Pavaroti, and you may have even liked it. Harmonious sound is pleasant to the senses, and because of that we at times do not realize what the song is about. To give a classic example, many singers give Leonard Cohen's song Hallelujah a very emotional religious interpretation. When one pays attention to the lyrics, he finds out that this is actually a sarcastic reference to a religious state of mind. If you are a religious person, you may have liked even better Panis Angelicus, though you most likely did not know the story behind the story told in it. 

The title of the song translates by Bread of Angels, and is a verse from a hymn called Sacris solemniis written in the 13th century by Thomas Aquinas. It was dedicated to the feast of Corpus Christi, the Solemnity of the Holy Body and Blood of Christ. While the lyrics of the song do not directly state the bread is the body of Christ, they imply that, this being an obvious reference to the passage in the Bible known as the last supper. In that passage, the apostles are told the bread on the table is the body of Jesus and the wine in the cup is Jesus' blood. Pretty creepy if you think about it, but this is what the text says and this is what they preach in churches. They have even came up with a little waffle so you could experience every Sunday the digesting of the body of Christ.

What most churchgoers do not know for they were never told the real story, the ritual known in church Christianity as the Eucharist is based on two non-Christian traditions that have nothing in common with the life of the one known under the name of Jesus (not his real name to begin with). At the time the Christian church was emerging after its founders, known as the Adversaries, that being the adversaries of true Christology, abandoned the original, the secular Christian school of thought and Jesus' anti-religion teachings and message, the people were celebrating goddess Ceres, the patron of agriculture. They did that, among others, by making and eating bread cakes that supposedly represented the "body of the goddess." They were also celebrating god Dionysus by drinking wine that supposedly was "the blood of the god."

No doubts about it, the last supper story is a made up story meant as a way of incorporating in church dogma traditions associated with older religions at the time when the bishops were trying to establish a monopoly on the business of religion and this way make church Christianity the one and only religion in the empire. Related to that and to the Christmas hymns sung in churches on different occasions, Jesus was not born in a manger, nor did he die on the cross, and as a result he did he resurrect either. The resurrection story does not even appear in the Sinai Bible, the oldest Bible we have at our disposition. In fact, as you are going to see in A Time of Change, there is absolutely nothing genuinely Christian in the Christianity of the church, or true.

(Edited February 17, 2022)

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A TIME OF CHANGE - VOLUME 1 OF 3 

A TIME OF CHANGE - VOLUME 2 OF 3 

A TIME OF CHANGE - VOLUME 3 OF 3 


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